LAURIE LISONBEE
artist
 
 
 

About the Art

For me, art is a fascinating search for something that is coming into consciousness and making itself known. The process of art-making then gives physicality to what was formerly intangible and unknown. My art derives from my identity and experience, and can reveal memory, stories, states of being, perceptual phenomena and the psycho-spiritual.

I integrate traditional painting with found objects and nontraditional distressed surfaces, created in a constructivist process involving assembling, drilling and screwing. Sometimes a weathered, battered object in an antique store immediately shows me what it was meant to be, and the found object is then transformed into an artwork. My art employs materials as diverse as tool boxes, antiques, chairs, metal tools, rulers, rocks, sand, metal leafing, etc.

The physical presence of these objects, then combined with the painted human figure, can convey worlds of meaning; human-pretzel poses and seemingly impossible balancing acts become metaphors for the treacherous predicaments of life. Little things I can hold in my hand land right in my paintings – stones, shells, bones or domestic objects. Juxtaposed with the figure, they become objects of meditation or something like dream symbols. Gestures of the figure and elements of obscured text hint of vows, rituals, devotionals, personal losses and yearnings. My interest in eastern meditation practices merges with the sublimity of western religious art forms such as the Romanesque arch. Snippets of art historical images spontaneously emerge out of my lifetime of visual storage, a history of both beauty and detritus.

Making these object-paintings becomes, for me, a devotional act akin to meditation. In a process that borders on the metaphysical, the object is laden with repetitive mark-making and intense personal involvement. The viewer’s own history and experience can find resonance with the art, so both artist and viewer find new meaning, making it a “whole is more than the sum” experience. This dialogue with one’s art, with oneself and with one’s audience is central to the process of creating.